Chicago Cityscape's '1909' newsletter

A representation of the combined City Hall and Cook County administration building in 1908, which sits on a plat of land that was annexed from the county to the city in 1830. Source: UIC Library’s Flickr

A group of Cook County agencies released a cool new map last month to show areas of the county when they were annexed into a municipality. The map is based on historical (often paper) records.

We’ve incorporated this map into our Places database, and in all Address Snapshot reports.

Want to know when your home or office was incorporated into the City of Chicago, or the part of Bartlett that’s in Cook County? Enter the address in this search bar.

Chicago’s City Hall, located at 121 N LaSalle St, is in a plat that was transferred from Unincorporated Cook County to “Chicago” (which didn’t incorporate as a town until August 12, 1833) on August 4, 1830.

This plat of land was annexed into Chicago from unincorporated Cook County in 1830, yet Chicago became a town in 1833.

It probably won’t be too useful but you can see current business licenses and building permits in that area, as you can in any of our Place pages.

Wanna learn more about this treasure trove of records? Cook County produced a story map to walk you through the timeline of annexations.


Find out when your property was annexed into Chicago or another municipality was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Chicago neighborhood news for << Test First Name >>
News for 01/19/17
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What's happening in Chicago

Chicago neighborhood news — Jan. 19

Moss Design’s first development project is called Logan Certified at 2857 W Diversey Ave.

Our regular collection of current and glossed over news includes 11 stories this week about TOD, preservation, eviction, NIMBYism, redeveloping abandoned housing, and a bigger distillery:

  • Moss Design, an architecture firm, ventures into real estate development for the first time, in Logan Square, and details the transformation of a former liquor store into “Logan Certified”
  • Emanuel proposes a plan to train residents to rehab about 50 vacant and abandoned houses in unspecified target areas using money leftover from a property tax rebate program (Defender)
  • Chicago Public Schools now offers a 2-year construction training program for juniors and seniors called “Chicago Builds”
  • A new high-rise in the South Loop has a massive-looking parking podium, around the corner from Roosevelt ‘L’ — is it TOD? (Streetsblog)
  • National Trust for Historic Preservation details the story behind a new Kimpton Hotel in a building designed by William Le Baron Jenney that was landmarked 10 years ago
  • Residents of a small building in Logan Square are being evicted and are asking for more time; Ald. Moreno may block zoning change for a much larger replacement building if it’s not resolved well (DNAinfo)
  • An apartment complex for seniors in Edgewater will now have 12 fewer units because of residents’ complaints, but keep the same number of heated parking spaces (Edgeville Buzz)
  • The Urban Institute interviewed Susan Popkin about her book chronicling the Chicago Housing Authority’s Plan for Transformation
  • A group of residents disapprove of young professionals paying $1,400 per month in rent at 32-unit proposal who won’t have an “emotional investment” in Bucktown (DNAinfo)
  • Koval Distillery buys its building so it can quadruple the size of that facility on Ravenswood and consolidate its other location (Tribune)
  • The City Council and the city’s planning department authorized property tax incentives for five companies to buy equipment or expand their businesses; see our Resources page for a list of all incentives

Thank you for subscribing to the Chicago Cityscape newsletter. If you ever have a question about our services, hit reply and ask!


Chicago neighborhood news — Jan. 19 was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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Thursday, January 19, 2017

Chicago neighborhood news — Jan. 19

Moss Design’s first development project is called Logan Certified at 2857 W Diversey Ave.

Our regular collection of current and glossed over news includes 11 stories this week about TOD, preservation, eviction, NIMBYism, redeveloping abandoned housing, and a bigger distillery:

  • Moss Design, an architecture firm, ventures into real estate development for the first time, in Logan Square, and details the transformation of a former liquor store into “Logan Certified”
  • Emanuel proposes a plan to train residents to rehab about 50 vacant and abandoned houses in unspecified target areas using money leftover from a property tax rebate program (Defender)
  • Chicago Public Schools now offers a 2-year construction training program for juniors and seniors called “Chicago Builds”
  • A new high-rise in the South Loop has a massive-looking parking podium, around the corner from Roosevelt ‘L’ — is it TOD? (Streetsblog)
  • National Trust for Historic Preservation details the story behind a new Kimpton Hotel in a building designed by William Le Baron Jenney that was landmarked 10 years ago
  • Residents of a small building in Logan Square are being evicted and are asking for more time; Ald. Moreno may block zoning change for a much larger replacement building if it’s not resolved well (DNAinfo)
  • An apartment complex for seniors in Edgewater will now have 12 fewer units because of residents’ complaints, but keep the same number of heated parking spaces (Edgeville Buzz)
  • The Urban Institute interviewed Susan Popkin about her book chronicling the Chicago Housing Authority’s Plan for Transformation
  • A group of residents disapprove of young professionals paying $1,400 per month in rent at 32-unit proposal who won’t have an “emotional investment” in Bucktown (DNAinfo)
  • Koval Distillery buys its building so it can quadruple the size of that facility on Ravenswood and consolidate its other location (Tribune)
  • The City Council and the city’s planning department authorized property tax incentives for five companies to buy equipment or expand their businesses; see our Resources page for a list of all incentives

Thank you for subscribing to the Chicago Cityscape newsletter. If you ever have a question about our services, hit reply and ask!


Chicago neighborhood news — Jan. 19 was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


The deadline for property owners to apply to purchase one of 3,844 city-owned lots near them for $1 in these 34 community areas is in 15 days and there are only 1,990 applications.

The worker’s cottage at 1307 S Talman Ave is adjacent to a Large Lot at 1313 S Talman Ave in North Lawndale. Photo by Gabriel X. Michael

That means 1,854 or more “Large Lots” haven’t been applied for. The number could be higher if some of those applications were for the same lot that someone else applied for.

The application period opened on November 29, a few days more than six weeks ago.

The Large Lots website received 603 applications by the next morning, so the application rate was very high early on. Within a week, property owners submitted over 1,000 applications.

Do you own a property on the South or West Sides? There might be a Large Lot available near you, so apply now. You can build certain things on it after acquisition, you’ll start paying property taxes on it, and you can sell it after five years. Here’s what else you can do with the property.


Thousands of $1 Large Lots haven’t been applied for was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Any developer who proposes a residential project with 10 or more units and receives either land or financial assistance from the city, a zoning change that increases density, or is in a downtown planned development or a TOD project, must provide some number of housing units designated as “affordable” and subsidize the cost of those units.

If it’s a zoning change, TOD, or planned development, the developer must provide 10 percent affordable units, and if they receive assistance, 25 percent must be affordable.

Developers must build at least 25 percent of them on site (in the same building or nearby for downtown projects). The developer can pay an “in-lieu” fee for the remaining 75 percent of the units.

Use Chicago Cityscape to determine the in-lieu fee for any address.

Scroll down any Address Snapshot to the “Building & Zoning info” to see its ARO status.

Look up any Address Snapshot and we’ll tell you the ARO status of low, high, or downtown, and remind you of the fee.

In the 29 community areas that are designated as “low to moderate income”, that fee is $50,000 per unit. In the 44 community areas and parts of three others labeled “high income”, the fee is $125,000 per unit. In the Loop community area and the remaining parts of those three community areas, the fee is $175,000 per unit.

A city map shows how the “downtown” area encompasses all of the Loop community area, the majority of the Near South Side, about half of the Near North Side, and a significant portion of the Near West Side.

Prior to the City Council’s change to the Affordable Requirements Ordinance in 2015, the fee was $100,000 per unit.


Quickly check a Chicago address’s “affordable housing in-lieu fee” was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Hi &lt;&lt;First Name>>,

I hope you noticed that the Chicago Cityscape email notifications for Places are back, and now they have even more information.

Our Place notifications now include "violations hearings". What are these? The Chicago Department of Buildings, Fire Department, or zoning division within the Department of Planning and Development can allege that a violation occurred which needs to be heard by an independent administrative law judge who is contracted by the Department of Administrative Hearings.

This section of your notification lists the addresses of properties whose owners (which can be many) must come to a hearing on that date.

You can see violations hearings for the entire city on our map:
http://www.chicagocityscape.com/maps.php?method=violations_hearings

They also have a little less information...in that you won't see TV and film permits so repeatedly. Instead you'll see each day only new filming permits that were issued since the previous day and that start within the next 3 days.

You can see filming permits for the entire city on this map:
http://www.chicagocityscape.com/filming.php

Thank you for subscribing to our Place notifications and reply to this email if you have other feedback!

-Steven
==============================================

Unsubscribe <<Email Address>> from this list:
http://chicagocityscape.us8.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=e2489bf46a0d5c42a5e06ce3f&id=df82562304&e=[UNIQID]&c=7bbb21c928

Hi &lt;&lt;First Name>>,

We apologize for the alarming email about demolitions permits this morning. There were not 599 demolition permits issued since yesterday. There were 0.

This was a bug that one of our readers reported to us this morning and we've resolved it.

You can always find the latest building demolition permits on Demolitions Tracker: https://www.chicagocityscape.com/demolitions.php

-Steven
==============================================

Unsubscribe <<Email Address>> from this list:
http://chicagocityscape.us8.list-manage.com/unsubscribe?u=e2489bf46a0d5c42a5e06ce3f&id=df82562304&e=[UNIQID]&c=aa892afcfe

"Montrose Green" TOD gets financing, and other neighborhood news
The neighborhood news we forgot to include yesterday
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Neighborhood news for January 12

We collected nearly 20 interesting news stories in the last 7 days to include in this weekly roundup, including in-depth articles that weren’t on traditional news sites, background on Chicago’s Transit TIF law, and a review of buildings demolished in 2016.

This list includes just half of those articles. We’ll start with a group of two NIMBY stories wherein residents rejected housing proposals:

  • 41st Ward Alderman Anthony Napolitano and Democratic Committeeman Tim Heneghan agree that “No matter how it was designed, a four-story housing complex just wouldn’t fly in Edison Park” (DNAinfo) — we listed what the developer of the property could build without permission
  • A group of residents in Wicker Park informally voted to reject a zoning change in order for a developer to build a 4-story six flat of condos on the block of Winchester Ave. north of North Ave. that only allows single unit houses despite there being many multi-unit buildings. (DNAinfo)

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The Chicago City Council terminated three TIF districts a month ago, and it took effect on December 31, 2016. They are:

  • Addison Corridor North in Avondale
  • 69th/Ashland in West Englewood
  • Calumet River in Hegewisch

The first two have funds returning to the City of Chicago and other taxing bodies; the third didn’t generate any increment above the property revenue amount when it was established in 2010. Read details about their closures in Mayor Emanuel’s press release.

The Addison Corridor North TIF district was terminated effective Dec. 31, 2016. The bulk of the area, in white, is occupied by ComEd facilities.

We have removed these three TIF districts from our Places and TIF Districts map, but retain the data for those who need it. Contact us if you need a copy of the map, or to know if a particular property was in one of those TIF districts.


Three TIF districts were terminated at the end of 2016 was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Thursday, January 12, 2017

Neighborhood news for January 12

We collected nearly 20 interesting news stories in the last 7 days to include in this weekly roundup, including in-depth articles that weren’t on traditional news sites, background on Chicago’s Transit TIF law, and a review of buildings demolished in 2016.

This housing proposal in Edison Park was rejected by the 41st Ward zoning advisory committee (story below)

This list includes just half of those articles. We’ll start with a group of two NIMBY stories wherein residents rejected housing proposals:

  • 41st Ward Alderman Anthony Napolitano and Democratic Committeeman Tim Heneghan agree that “No matter how it was designed, a four-story housing complex just wouldn’t fly in Edison Park” (DNAinfo) — we listed what the developer of the property could build without permission
  • A group of residents in Wicker Park informally voted to reject a zoning change in order for a developer to build a 4-story six flat of condos on the block of Winchester Ave. north of North Ave. that only allows single unit houses despite there being many multi-unit buildings. (DNAinfo)
Property developer David Brown describes the TOD project he’s building at 1819 W Montrose Ave, adjacent to the Montrose Brown Line station. The project now has financing from Cedar Street (story below).

Neighborhood news for January 12 was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


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'1909' brings you Chicago neighborhood development news and events every week.

1909 was the year that Daniel Burnham and Edward Bennett published the Plan of Chicago that forever changed the cityscape. The cityscape changes everyday and we track how and where on Chicago Cityscape.


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