Chicago Cityscape's '1909' newsletter

A shipping container market opened in Bronzeville last night
News for 06/22/17
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A shipping container market opened in Bronzeville last night

Photo by Soren Spicknall

Bernard Lloyd’s “Boxville” opened last night at 51st and Calumet in Bronzeville. Chicago Magazine previewed the new outdoor plaza and market, adjacent to the overhead Green Line tracks, yesterday morning. Boxville, as you might imagine, comprises four shipping used shipping containers. Janet Rausa Fuller wrote,

Picture four giant metal Lego pieces, plunked down in a grassy vacant lot with a wood-planked plaza in the middle — but those Lego pieces are filled with groceries, prepared food, a boutique, and a bike repair shop.

Boxville has four vendors right now: Green City Market will sell pre-picked boxes of fruits and vegetables; Aplomb, a clothing and home goods store; Friistyle, which sells Belgian-style fries; and the original Bronzeville Bike Box. The market will be open every Wednesday and soon five days a week.

“The monthly rent for half of a 20-foot container at Boxville is $500. That would barely cover the electricity and maintenance costs of a 1,200-square-foot storefront, [Lloyd] says.” Continue reading about Lloyd.

Photos from the event, by Katana Raby (left), Soren Spicknall (right)

We’ve improved two of our development maps

TIF map (left); Ordinances map (right)
  • The TIF map has been updated to show Chicago’s sole Transit TIF (for the Red-Purple Modernization project), and Cook County TIF districts outside of Chicago.
  • The Ordinances map (zoning changes, city-owned land sales) was updated to display different icons for the different ordinance types.

Neighborhood news

  • Alder Sophia King (4th Ward) explains the details of a large expansion of Harper Court, which the University of Chicago’s Polsky Center would move into (Hyde Park Herald)
  • At a Large Lots workshop in May, a planning department official said, but wasn’t sure, that Streets & Sanitation workers would clean up vacant lots; the department came through (Twitter)
  • Crain’s profiles Paula Robinson, who is the Bronzeville-based partner in the winning team that will redevelop the former Michael Reese hospital site in Bronzeville
  • Streetsblog Chicago, the city’s only alternative transportation & land use news site, is hosting its monthly happy hour on July 5th at Revolution Brewing’s taproom in Avondale; $100+ donors get a free drink
  • Public health students at UIC are working with the Urban Innovation Center in Bronzeville to find vacant sites suitable for solar farms that would power a community micro-grid (Social Justice News Nexus)
  • Public housing is not a failure, it was always someone’s home — Urban Omnibus recaps 60 years of history and discusses the pros and cons of Chicago’s current plan for mixed-income redevelopment
  • With new attention and growth in Woodlawn, redevelopment could threaten and demolish in-use buildings that have been around since the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893 (Chicago Patterns)

A shipping container market opened in Bronzeville last night was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Need more Chicago development news and data?

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Photo by Soren Spicknall

Bernard Lloyd’s “Boxville” opened last night at 51st and Calumet in Bronzeville. Chicago Magazine previewed the new outdoor plaza and market, adjacent to the overhead Green Line tracks, yesterday morning. Boxville, as you might imagine, comprises four shipping used shipping containers. Janet Rausa Fuller wrote,

Picture four giant metal Lego pieces, plunked down in a grassy vacant lot with a wood-planked plaza in the middle — but those Lego pieces are filled with groceries, prepared food, a boutique, and a bike repair shop.

Boxville has four vendors right now: Green City Market will sell pre-picked boxes of fruits and vegetables; Aplomb, a clothing and home goods store; Friistyle, which sells Belgian-style fries; and the original Bronzeville Bike Box. The market will be open every Wednesday and soon five days a week.

“The monthly rent for half of a 20-foot container at Boxville is $500. That would barely cover the electricity and maintenance costs of a 1,200-square-foot storefront, [Lloyd] says.” Continue reading about Lloyd.

Photos from the event, by Katana Raby (left), Soren Spicknall (right)

We’ve improved two of our development maps

TIF map (left); Ordinances map (right)
  • The TIF map has been updated to show Chicago’s sole Transit TIF (for the Red-Purple Modernization project), and Cook County TIF districts outside of Chicago.
  • The Ordinances map (zoning changes, city-owned land sales) was updated to display different icons for the different ordinance types.

Neighborhood news

  • Alder Sophia King (4th Ward) explains the details of a large expansion of Harper Court, which the University of Chicago’s Polsky Center would move into (Hyde Park Herald)
  • At a Large Lots workshop in May, a planning department official said, but wasn’t sure, that Streets & Sanitation workers would clean up vacant lots; the department came through (Twitter)
  • Crain’s profiles Paula Robinson, who is the Bronzeville-based partner in the winning team that will redevelop the former Michael Reese hospital site in Bronzeville
  • Streetsblog Chicago, the city’s only alternative transportation & land use news site, is hosting its monthly happy hour on July 5th at Revolution Brewing’s taproom in Avondale; $100+ donors get a free drink
  • Public health students at UIC are working with the Urban Innovation Center in Bronzeville to find vacant sites suitable for solar farms that would power a community micro-grid (Social Justice News Nexus)
  • Public housing is not a failure, it was always someone’s home — Urban Omnibus recaps 60 years of history and discusses the pros and cons of Chicago’s current plan for mixed-income redevelopment
  • With new attention and growth in Woodlawn, redevelopment could threaten and demolish in-use buildings that have been around since the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893 (Chicago Patterns)

A shipping container market opened in Bronzeville last night was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


What is CPS going to do with additional closed schools?
News for 06/15/17
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What is CPS going to do with additional closed schools?

The former Overton school in Grand Boulevard, designed by Perkins & Will, opened in 1963, closed in 2013, and was purchased by Washington Park Development Group in 2015.

The Chicago Public Schools has proposed closing four high schools in Englewood and would build a new high school for $75 million and have a combined attendance boundary for students who today would go to those schools. The purpose is said to provide a new building with modern amenities.

In Englewood, CPS closed five elementary schools — all of which are vacant. As part of the proposal, CPS would demolish Robeson and build the new school there. The buildings that have Hope and TEAM Englewood high schools would remain because they are used by adjoining charter schools. CPS doesn’t have a plan for Harper, the fourth high school.

Asiaha Butler, president of R.A.G.E., was interviewed by Chicago Reporter.

“They really jacked up the repurposing process [after the 2013 closures],” Butler said. “For me, it’s always been a concern about these institutions becoming vacant spaces and becoming like the homes we have here with the Xs on the buildings.”

Check the status on the dozens of other closed schools using Chicago Reporter’s always-updated map.

Neighborhood news

  • Juan Moreno of JGMA is designing a new health care facility and community center on a large vacant lot in Brighton Park (Crain’s)
  • A Safe Haven Foundation is seeking a zoning change at next week’s meeting in order to build a new 100-unit SRO across from Douglas Park
  • The development of Roosevelt Square (former public housing land, map) is resuming after the 2008 recession with 50 market-rate townhomes in the University Village/Little Italy neighborhood (DNAinfo)
  • The Garfield Park Art & Industry Expo is this Saturday, 6/17, at the former horse stables and market area north of the conservatory
  • Aaron Rose recaps a recent Ethical Redevelopment Salon wherein architect Peter Baker (Landon Bone Baker) describes the firm’s design philosophy and many of their recent projects which have affordable housing and supportive services components on the South & West Sides (Place Lab)

Do you have neighborhood news? Reply and send us a link.


What is CPS going to do with additional closed schools? was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Need more Chicago development news and data?

Start a free trial of our Pro or Permits memberships today

Gain access to analysis, research tools, and custom maps. Pro membership starts at $249/year, and Permits membership is $99/year.

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The former Overton school in Grand Boulevard, designed by Perkins & Will, opened in 1963, closed in 2013, and was purchased by Washington Park Development Group in 2015.

The Chicago Public Schools has proposed closing four high schools in Englewood and would build a new high school for $75 million and have a combined attendance boundary for students who today would go to those schools. The purpose is said to provide a new building with modern amenities.

In Englewood, CPS closed five elementary schools — all of which are vacant. As part of the proposal, CPS would demolish Robeson and build the new school there. The buildings that have Hope and TEAM Englewood high schools would remain because they are used by adjoining charter schools. CPS doesn’t have a plan for Harper, the fourth high school.

Asiaha Butler, president of R.A.G.E., was interviewed by Chicago Reporter.

“They really jacked up the repurposing process [after the 2013 closures],” Butler said. “For me, it’s always been a concern about these institutions becoming vacant spaces and becoming like the homes we have here with the Xs on the buildings.”

Check the status on the dozens of other closed schools using Chicago Reporter’s always-updated map.

Neighborhood news

  • Juan Moreno of JGMA is designing a new health care facility and community center on a large vacant lot in Brighton Park (Crain’s)
  • A Safe Haven Foundation is seeking a zoning change at next week’s meeting in order to build a new 100-unit SRO across from Douglas Park
  • The development of Roosevelt Square (former public housing land, map) is resuming after the 2008 recession with 50 market-rate townhomes in the University Village/Little Italy neighborhood (DNAinfo)
  • The Garfield Park Art & Industry Expo is this Saturday, 6/17, at the former horse stables and market area north of the conservatory
  • Aaron Rose recaps a recent Ethical Redevelopment Salon wherein architect Peter Baker (Landon Bone Baker) describes the firm’s design philosophy and many of their recent projects which have affordable housing and supportive services components on the South & West Sides (Place Lab)

Do you have neighborhood news? Reply and send us a link.


What is CPS going to do with additional closed schools? was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Two weeks ago a friend was in town and he wanted to check out the hot air balloon that I recently got. He suggested we photograph the new Wilson station that the Chicago Transit Authority is building in the Uptown community area. It was a great idea, because the station looks better from above than from below.

https://medium.com/media/28773fb1b73affb93706908501e908ac/href

The project is a $203 million replacement of the station, platforms, and about 3/4 mile of track and guideway.

The view of the station on May 27, 2017, looking southeast (left) and south (right).

Aerial photography created on a DJI Mavic Pro.


Eyes in the air: Wilson ‘L’ station was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Two housing developments have been proposed in the Rogers Park community area that would expand the number of residential units in each existing building. According to Alder Moore’s website, David Gasman has an agreement to purchase two buildings near the Rogers Park Metra station contingent on Moore granting each building a zoning change.

A rendering of the restoration and renovation of an existing apartment building at 1710 W Lunt Ave (left). The existing building (right). Photo provided by Alder Moore.

The building at 1710 W Lunt Ave (above) would need a zoning change from RT-4 to B2–3 in order to expand the number of units from 8 to 20 in a three-story rear addition, and to take advantage of the TOD law so the property could have 5 car parking spaces instead of 20.

The building at 1730 W Greenleaf Ave (below) would need a zoning change from C1–2 to B2–3 in order to build out 30 dwelling units inside the existing commercial building. The building would also need the Zoning Administrator to relieve the rule so the building can have zero car parking spaces under the TOD law. Moore’s website says he would support the zoning change for this building if the relief comes as a Type 1 amendment rather than an administrative adjustment, to ensure that the renovation strictly adheres to the proposed plans and approved permits.

A rendering of the two-story addition, restoration, and renovation of an existing apartment building at 1730 W Greenleaf Ave (left). The existing building (right). Photo provided by Alder Moore.

The city’s Affordable Requirements Ordinance (ARO) will kick in on both projects because they (1) have 10 or more dwelling units, and (2) receive a zoning change. This means that 10 percent of the units in each building will have to be affordable to a household earning up to 60 percent of the Area Median Income (AMI). Of those units, 25 percent must be on-site, and the remaining 75 percent can be on-site, or “bought out” with an in-lieu fee of $50,000 per unit.

Network 49, a neighborhood organization, is going to ask Alder Moore to require that a legally-enforceable Community Benefits Agreement (CBA) gets drafted and signed, so that the developer provides a public benefit in exchange for the zoning change because “that exchange is worth a ton of $$$ for the developer”.

Arguably, the ARO already takes care of that, as does the provision of additional dwelling units in the neighborhood. A greater supply of housing maintains housing prices, or has slower increases, compared to an area that has restricted — often due to zoning or community opposition — housing growth.

The zoning change for the building on Lunt should be granted without question because the current zoning downzoned the block and placed it and buildings nearby into “legal, non-conforming” status. In other words, the previous zoning was denser than the current zoning, and allowed this building and adjacent buildings to be constructed in the first place.

Moore and Gasman are hosting a public meeting on Wednesday, June 14th, 7:00 p.m., at the Ethiopian Community Center of Chicago, 1730 W. Greenleaf.


Zoning change needed to add 42 units in two buildings in Rogers Park was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


Downzoning to residential-only would affect existing businesses
News for 06/08/17
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Downzoning to residential-only would affect existing businesses

Two recent news reports about the proposals to change the zoning of business districts in South Shore and Bridgeport into a zoning class that allows only the new construction of single-family housing suggest that the change wouldn’t affect existing businesses.

A vacant storefront on Halsted Street in Bridgeport. Photo by Katherine Hodges.

Existing businesses could be affected in several ways if their zoning is changed from one that allows them (B, C) to one that doesn’t (R):

  1. They will not be able to expand into an adjacent space
  2. They will not be able to move into a different space in the neighborhood that also has the residential-only zoning
  3. They will not be able to sell additional products or services that are regulated by zoning code (this is mostly relevant to a business that would want to add live entertainment with a public place of amusement license, or start serving liquor; it would also prevent a laundromat from adding dry cleaning drop off service)
  4. They will not be able to do certain kinds of renovations or pull certain kinds of building permits
  5. They won’t be able to add a patio or beer garden (regardless of liquor license status)
  6. They won’t be able to put a sign up on their building
  7. They cannot sublease and vacate their space to another business (once a business is legally nonconforming in a space, it cannot transfer this status to a new business that would occupy the same space)

All of these restrictions can be circumvented by either a zoning change back to B or C, an “administrative adjustment” made by the zoning administrator, or getting a variance from the Zoning Board of Appeals — all an arduous, timely, and costly process.

Track zoning changes citywide, or in your area

Neighborhood news

  • The Chicago Tribune dropped an astonishing analysis about residential property taxes in Cook County and how the assessor’s office has been undervaluing high-value homes and overvaluing low-value homes for a decade because of a sneaky assessment model (you can also enter your address to see how if your block is under- or overvalued)
  • The recipients of the first round of grants from the Neighborhood Opportunity Fund were announced; Sip & Savor will open a fourth coffee shop, in Bronzeville (Sun-Times)
  • City Bureau is hosting a “public newsroom” event tonight about the West Side, including stories about a former city incinerator, and “questions of environmental justice and land use”
The city’s former incinerator in Humboldt Park. Photos by Steven Vance.
  • Column: Mayor Emanuel should support the affordable housing proposal in Jefferson Park so “we can move past our racist history” (Reporter)
  • Southwest Organizing Project and Brinshore Development are buying vacant houses and refurbishing them, need to raise $10 million (WTTW)

Downzoning to residential-only would affect existing businesses was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Need more Chicago development news and data?

Start a free trial of our Pro or Permits memberships today

Gain access to analysis, research tools, and custom maps. Pro membership starts at $249/year, and Permits membership is $99/year.

Recent blog posts

Quick links

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Questions? Reply to this email or contact us
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Two recent news reports about the proposals to change the zoning of business districts in South Shore and Bridgeport into a zoning class that allows only the new construction of single-family housing suggest that the change wouldn’t affect existing businesses.

A vacant storefront on Halsted Street in Bridgeport. Photo by Katherine Hodges.

Existing businesses could be affected in several ways if their zoning is changed from one that allows them (B, C) to one that doesn’t (R):

  1. They will not be able to expand into an adjacent space
  2. They will not be able to move into a different space in the neighborhood that also has the residential-only zoning
  3. They will not be able to sell additional products or services that are regulated by zoning code (this is mostly relevant to a business that would want to add live entertainment with a public place of amusement license, or start serving liquor; it would also prevent a laundromat from adding dry cleaning drop off service)
  4. They will not be able to do certain kinds of renovations or pull certain kinds of building permits
  5. They won’t be able to add a patio or beer garden (regardless of liquor license status)
  6. They won’t be able to put a sign up on their building
  7. They cannot sublease and vacate their space to another business (once a business is legally nonconforming in a space, it cannot transfer this status to a new business that would occupy the same space)

All of these restrictions can be circumvented by either a zoning change back to B or C, an “administrative adjustment” made by the zoning administrator, or getting a variance from the Zoning Board of Appeals — all an arduous, timely, and costly process.

Track zoning changes citywide, or in your area

Neighborhood news

  • The Chicago Tribune dropped an astonishing analysis about residential property taxes in Cook County and how the assessor’s office has been undervaluing high-value homes and overvaluing low-value homes for a decade because of a sneaky assessment model (you can also enter your address to see how if your block is under- or overvalued)
  • The recipients of the first round of grants from the Neighborhood Opportunity Fund were announced; Sip & Savor will open a fourth coffee shop, in Bronzeville (Sun-Times)
  • City Bureau is hosting a “public newsroom” event tonight about the West Side, including stories about a former city incinerator, and “questions of environmental justice and land use”
The city’s former incinerator in Humboldt Park. Photos by Steven Vance.
  • Column: Mayor Emanuel should support the affordable housing proposal in Jefferson Park so “we can move past our racist history” (Reporter)
  • Southwest Organizing Project and Brinshore Development are buying vacant houses and refurbishing them, need to raise $10 million (WTTW)

Downzoning to residential-only would affect existing businesses was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


A friend of mine was interested in finding a place where she could locate a new business she wanted to start. The type of business can only be located in an M zone, and inside of a pretty large building. They tried using commercial real estate listings websites but found inaccurate information, and outdated listings.

My friend turned to Chicago Cityscape for help targeting her search to specific parts of the city to either find a worthy property herself, or assist an broker by narrowing the candidate properties and locations to ones that would actually work for her business.

We redesigned Property Finder to make it easy to find developable land in Chicago and Cook County using your personal search criteria.

You can search for vacant land, occupied land, land owned by the city or the Cook County Land Bank Authority, parking lots, or suspected brownfields — all of which are open sources of data.

We cannot include CRE or other real estate listings because those are proprietary databases.

You can filter the results by zoning (Chicago only), land area, and distance to CTA and Metra stations. You can filter Cook County parcels by property classification, assessed value, and the cost of its most recent tax bill.

Use Property Finder to quickly focus your search for developable land.

Examples of how to use it:

  • Search for vacant land within two blocks of CTA stations in Chicago, which are eligible for density bonuses and parking minimum reductions
  • Search for all mixed-use zoned, city-owned land near CTA and Metra stations in Chicago
  • Search for industrial buildings or zoning districts in Avondale, Pullman, or any ward, neighborhood, industrial corridor, community area, and TIF district

You can use Property Finder for research, too. We looked up how many single-family houses are located around CTA stations, because of how zoning can restrict housing production, especially near transit stations where the highest allowed density should be set.

Finally, you can save searches to your account so that you can reference them later, and download them as a map for GIS programs, or as a spreadsheet. All of our export features require a Pro membership, and we’ve increased our free trial period from 14 days to a full month.

We’re always looking for your feedback on our tools — please contact us if you have any questions on how to use Property Finder, or have a suggestion to improve it.


New Property Finder is a powerful tool to locate developable land in Cook County was originally published in Chicago Cityscape on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.


New construction activity for week of Sun, May 28, 2017 to Sat, Jun 3, 2017
City-owned land

Chicago Cityscape

Weekly Pro member newsletter for Sun, May 28 to Sat, Jun 3

Hi <<First Name>>, we send out this new construction newsletter every Monday morning to our hundreds of Pro members to inform them of major news in the past week. It includes a summary of the top-performing companies, significant zoning changes, and major projects that were recently permitted or announced.

Start a free 30-day trial to get this newsletter every week, part of so many other features exclusive to our Pro members. Also, save 20% using coupon TRIAL20.
Start a free trial now
Aerial photo of 2FM on Throop
The city's "Chicago Infrastructure Trust" is looking for responsive developers to design, build, and finance a new fleet maintenance facility to replace the existing facility near Goose Island.

Read more
Rogers Park fire station
The city-owned fire station at 1721–23 W Greenleaf Avenue in Rogers Park is set to be sold to Jim Andrews and Dean Vance. 

Read more
View other city-owned land
Last week's news
The Chinese-based company that's going to build the CTA's next 7000-series 'L' cars got a permit to build a $40 million factory in Hegewisch on Centerpoint Properties-owned land. 

Curbed Chicago
A new affordable housing development for senior citizens got a new construction permit. The building is developed by Full Circle Communities on former city-owned land next to the Brainerd Metra station.

Curbed Chicago

Zoning changes

About 50 zoning change ordinances were introduced at the City Council meeting two weeks ago (May 24). Review them on our new map to see what new construction projects are coming in the city's development pipeline, before they're permitted.

Only Pro members can read our summaries, to quickly ascertain the changes.

Companies

Top 5 companies & architects this past week

Get the full list of the top 100 on the web.

Company Permits Total Est. Projects Cost
Abitua Plumbing, Inc. 1 $45,000,000.00
All Masonry Const. Co. Inc 1 $45,000,000.00
Block Electric Company 1 $45,000,000.00
F.h. Paschen, S.n. Nielsen & A 1 $45,000,000.00
Paul Wiese 1 $45,000,000.00

Companies may appear more than once if they are listed as more than one type of contractor.

Map all New Construction permits in the last 7 days

New construction activity

  1. $45,000,000 project at 11601 W Touhy Ave in O'hare

    New maintenance facility for american airlines ground equipment maintenance (gem). the building is proposed to be comprised...

  2. $300,000 project at 2512 W Harrison St in Lawndale

    Erect a new 3 story 3 d.u. masonry residential building with metal rear open porch and...

  3. $250,000 project at 3023 N Leavitt St in Lake View

    New two story single family residence with basement, new rear wood deck and front roofed porch. new...

  4. $250,000 project at 10812 S St Louis Ave in Mount Greenwood

    Erect a new 2 story frame single family residence with basement, front open porch, rear open deck...

  5. $250,000 project at 4138 N Mozart St in Albany Park

    New 2 story single family residence with basement. new 2 car frame garage . install 6 feet high...

  6. $225,000 project at 1920 N Milwaukee Ave in Bucktown

    Self cert, first time tenant buildout, commercial interior improvements to existing building. occupancy: f- mercantile

  7. $180,000 project at 1814 W 108th Pl in Morgan Park

    New construction ground up 2 story frame house. 3 bedroom two bath second floor. new side drive...

  8. $60,000 project at 1140 N Wells St in Near North

    Phase 2 tie-in and climb schedule for a manitowoc md485 temporary tower crane, as per plans

  9. $50,000 project at 8201 S Michigan Ave in Chatham

    Proposed installation is a new telecommunications facility on rooftop consisting of nine (9) new antennas, two (2...

  10. $35,000 project at 3057 W Wilson Ave in Albany Park

    Replace (2) 3-story wood, open porches with new, same size and location, as per plans

  11. $34,000 project at 2174 W Wilson Ave in Ravenswood

    New detached garage with a roof deck and a new deck and stairway to the deck and...

  12. $30,000 project at 201 E Randolph St in Loop

    Permit expires on 08/01/2017 erection starts: 6/2/2017, erection ends: 8/1/2017. chase...

  13. $25,000 project at 9 N Ada St in Near West Side

    Construction of a new detached masonry garage 372 sq ft with a roof top deck. **certified plan...

  14. $25,000 project at 808 N Lake Shore Dr in Gold Coast

    Permit expires on 08/01/2017 erection starts: 5/28/2017, erection ends: 6/7/2017. museum...

  15. $25,000 project at 5343 N Lakewood Ave in Lakewood - Balmoral

    Self-cert: new wood frame, one story garage only with exterior masonry fireplace per plans

  16. $21,000 project at 2847 N Racine Ave in Lake View

    New steel porch to replace existing wood porch

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'1909' brings you Chicago neighborhood development news and events every week.

1909 was the year that Daniel Burnham and Edward Bennett published the Plan of Chicago that forever changed the cityscape. The cityscape changes everyday and we track how and where on Chicago Cityscape.


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